The first Superbowl


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It was 1967 - The very first Super Bowl. I was in the 7th grade. To be honest, I don't remember. My dad was more of a baseball fan. The closest we got to liking football, was when we lived in the Haight Ashbury, around the corner from Kezar Stadium where the San Francisco 49ers played. We used to rent out our long driveway to fans to park their cars. We also used to listen to the game - literally we could hear the roar from the crowds inside our house.

This remains the only Super Bowl not to have been a sellout. It also is the only Super Bowl to have been simulcast in the United States by two networks: NBC had the rights to nationally televise AFL games, while CBS held the rights to broadcast NFL games; both networks were allowed to televise the game. The first Super Bowl's entertainment largely consisted of college bands, instead of featuring popular singers and musicians as in more recent Super Bowls. The first Super Bowl halftime show featured American trumpeter Al Hirt, and the marching bands from the University of Arizona and Grambling State University.

 The Green Bay Packers were each paid a salary of $15,000 as the winning team. The Chiefs were paid $7,500 each.

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